• Lorraine Anyango, is an HIV advocate and the Tulumbe! Project Coordinator. She has worked across a number of domestic and global programs that are advocating for, improving the lives of, and providing opportunities for young people around the world. She particularly focuses on advocating for policies that impact the sexual and reproductive health and rights of young people, and policies that impact people living with HIV.
  • Carol Bova PhD, RN, is a Professor of Nursing and Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester.  Her clinical work as a nurse practitioner spanned more than 26 years providing care to adults with HIV infection. She has conducted funded research on HIV, women and HIV, HIV prevention, Hepatitis C virus infection, substance abuse, mental illness, adherence behavior, and patient-provide trust.  She is especially interested in community-engaged research, research ethics and scale development.
  • Sekou Kaba, African Community Leader
  • Frederick Kiggundu, is the program coordinator for Africans for Improved Access (AFIA) at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition (MAC).
  • Mbita Mbao, is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker working in private practice conducting home visits for psychotherapy. She has worked with clients experiencing different diagnosis including, trauma, depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders and addictions. She utilizes an eclectic approach and uses different methods tailored to each individual client’s needs.
  • Eduardo E. Nettle, Population Health Program Manager for the Office of HIV/AIDS (OHA), Bureau of Infectious Disease at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health
  • Chioma Nnaji, is a community organizer, activist and scholar currently working as a Program Director at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition. She founded the Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program – the first state-funded program in Massachusetts to address HIV/STI among African immigrants. In this role, she organizes communities to address root causes underlying the epidemic; develops programs and interventions for people living with and impacted by HIV/AIDS; advocates for policy changes addressing the ‘hidden epidemic’ among African immigrants; applies anti-racist and cultural competency frameworks to training public health and clinical professionals; and establishes community-academic research projects that are ‘for, by and with’ the people most impacted by inequities. Ms. Nnaji is passionate about her work and is committed to bringing the voice and needs of African diaspora communities to the table of health policy, research, and service delivery in a way that utilizes community assets and respects cultural values.
  • Bisola Ojikutu, MD MPH, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), an Associate Physician within the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and a faculty member in the Infectious Disease Division at Massachusetts General Hospital where she has an active clinical practice treating patients living with or at risk for HIV, providing primary care and care for general infectious diseases. Dr. Ojikutu’s research focuses on overcoming racial and ethnic disparities in HIV prevention, care and treatment.
  • Dara Oloyede, MPH, is a Nigerian-American immigrant and Colorado transplant living in Boston. She holds a Masters of Public Health from Boston University in Maternal & Child Health and Program Management. She is excited to be apart of Tulumbe! because of her love of the African diaspora and working with African immigrants to organize and drive improvements in population health. During her free time she likes to be outdoors, attend community events, and explore the Boston community.
  • Siede Slopadoe, MPH, is currently a Program Coordinator at the MAC’s Africans for Improved Access (AFIA) Program where her work is dedicated to mobilizing the African immigrant and refugee communities of Massachusetts, to address increasing HIV/AIDS rates among this population. Her role in defining effective outreach, education and support strategies for African immigrants has won her a relationship of trust within the community.